Tutorial on using Evernote on the command line of Linux

Time:2022-6-2

Geeknote installation

Geeknote was developed using python. So before you start, make sure you have python (preferably version 2.7) and git installed.
In Debian, Ubuntu, and Linux MINT

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ sudo apt-get install python2.7 git python-setuptools
$ git clone git://github.com/VitaliyRodnenko/geeknote.git
$ cd geeknote
$ sudo python2.7 setup.py install

In Fedora or centos/rhel

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ sudo yum install git
$ git clone git://github.com/VitaliyRodnenko/geeknote.git
$ cd geeknote
$ sudo python setup.py install

In arch Linux

For archlinux users, only theAURPackages in.
Basic use of geeknote

Once you have installed geeknote, you should associate geeknote with your Evernote account:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote login

Then enter your email address, password and your two-step verification code. If you don’t have the latter, ignore it and press enter.
2015611175923252.jpg (329×112)

Obviously you need an Evernote account to do this, so register first.

After that, you can start creating new notes and editing them.

But first, you need to set up your favorite text editor:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote settings –editor vim

Then, the general syntax for creating a new note is:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote create –title [title of the new note] (–content [content] –tags [comma-separated tags] –notebook [comma-separated notebooks])

In the above command, only ‘title’ is required. It will be associated with the title of a new note. Other annotations can add additional metadata to the notes: add tags to associate with your notes and specify which notebook to put in. Also, if you have spaces in your title or content, don’t forget to put them in quotation marks.

For example:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote create –title “My note” –content “This is a test note” –tags “finance, business, important” –notebook “Family”

Then you can edit your notes. The syntax is similar:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote edit –note [title of the note to edit] (–title [new title] –tags [new tags] –notebook [new notebooks])

Note that optional parameters such as new title, label and notebook are used to modify the metadata of the notes. You can also rename the note with the following command:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote edit –note [old title] –title [new title]

Now the basic creation and editing have been completed. The more advanced feature is search and deletion. You can search your notes using the following syntax:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote find –search [text-to-search] –tags [comma-separated tags] –notebook [comma-separated notebooks] –date [date-or-date-range] –content-search

By default, the above command searches for notes by title. Use the “–content-search” option to search by content.

For example:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote find –search “*restaurant” –notebooks “Family” –date 31.03.2014-31.08.2014

Show notes with the specified title:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote show [title]

 2015611175945459.jpg (417×200)

One of my favorite techniques is to use:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote show “*”

This will show all the notes and allow you to select one of them.

Delete a note:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote remove –note [title]

Be careful this is the real deletion. It will delete this note from cloud storage.

Finally, there are many options to manage tags and notebooks. I think the most useful thing is to display a list of notebooks.

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote notebook-list

    2015611180006553.jpg (295×83)

The following commands are very similar. As you can guess, you can list all the tags with the following command:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote tag-list

Create a notebook:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote notebook-create –title [notebook title]

Create a label:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ geeknote tag-create –title [tag title]

Once you get the hang of it, it’s clear that the grammar is very natural.

If you want to know more, don’t forget to checkOfficial documents
welfare

As a bonus, geeknote’s own gnsync tool allows you to synchronize between Evernote and your local computer. However, I found its grammar a little boring:

   

Copy code

The codes are as follows:

$ gnsync –path [where to sync] (–mask [what kind of file to sync] –format [in which format] –logpath [where to write the log] –notebook [which notebook to use])