How to install Gnome graphical desktop to RedHat system

Time:2020-12-17

Although Linux administrators may not need a graphical user interface, users transferred from Microsoft Windows do. For this reason, Linux needs a GUI to make Microsoft Windows users more comfortable.

Red Hat Linux provides gnome, the GNU Network Object Model environment. Gnome not only provides high-performance GUI, but also provides high-performance software such as office components, for which Microsoft users have to pay hundreds of dollars. Of course, Linux doesn’t have a license fee. This has led many companies and governments to switch from Microsoft Windows to Linux.
Gnome provides GUI interface, control applet and several important applications. Many of these components: can replace expensive third-party applications that only run in Microsoft Windows. This chapter briefly introduces the GNOME desktop.
In addition, the red hat version of Gnome can use KDE applications and utilities, and many KDE tools can be accessed directly from the Gnome main menu button.
Graphical desktop environment provides users with three main tools to use the applications on the system, namely panel icon, desktop icon and menu system.
The strip across the bottom of the desktop is called a panel, which is the core of the graphical interface. The panel contains the application launcher, the notification area for the alert icon, and a small application called an applet. They allow users to control volume, switch workspaces, and display system status.

The standard GNOME desktop has all the features of today’s GUI operating system, including panels, main menu buttons, and icons. You can customize each component as needed, and even configure the standard interface for Gnome installation. You can control and customize the appearance of Gnome through the Gnome control center. The first time you start the GUI in Red Hat Linux, you can see the desktop.
The basic Gnome interface is simple. As shown in the figure, you can navigate to the home directory (the home directory of the user name), the start here button opens applets, utilities and applications, and a trash folder. All three use Nautilus, an explorer style graphical shell for managing files, Gnome configurations, and any GUI tools associated with Linux systems.

Here are the basic installation methods:
1: Check the operating level of the system and whether the desktop environment is installed

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The code is as follows:

[[email protected] ~]# runlevel

N 3

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The code is as follows:

[[email protected] ~]# yum grouplist | more

Loaded plugins: product-id, security, subscription-manager
This system is not registered to Red Hat Subscription Management. You can use subscription-
manager to register.
Setting up Group Process
Installed Groups:
   Additional Development
   Base
   Console internet tools
   Directory Client
   E-mail server
   Fonts
   Graphical Administration Tools
   Hardware monitoring utilities
   Java Platform
   Large Systems Performance
   Legacy UNIX compatibility
   Legacy X Window System compatibility
   NFS file server
   Network file system client
   Networking Tools
   PHP Support
   Performance Tools
   Perl Support
   Scientific support
   Security Tools
   Server Platform
   System Management
   System administration tools
   TurboGears application framework
   Web Server

You can also use the following command to verify that desktop environment components are installed

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The code is as follows:

[[email protected] ~]# ps -A | egrep -i “gnome|kde|mate|cinnamon|lx|xfce|jwm”
[[email protected] ~]#

2: Install desktop environment related software group

Using Yum grouplist, you can see that desktop, desktop platfrom, X window system, graphics creation tools and other desktop environment related software components can be installed

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The code is as follows:

[[email protected] ~]# yum groupinstall “Desktop” “Desktop Platform”
[[email protected] ~]# yum groupinstall “X Window System” “Graphics Creation Tools”


3: The boot level is modified to 5

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The code is as follows:

[[email protected] ~]# vi /etc/inittab

# inittab is only used by upstart for the default runlevel.
#
# ADDING OTHER CONFIGURATION HERE WILL HAVE NO EFFECT ON YOUR SYSTEM.
#
# System initialization is started by /etc/init/rcS.conf
#
# Individual runlevels are started by /etc/init/rc.conf
#
# Ctrl-Alt-Delete is handled by /etc/init/control-alt-delete.conf
#
# Terminal gettys are handled by /etc/init/tty.conf and /etc/init/serial.conf,
# with configuration in /etc/sysconfig/init.
#
# For information on how to write upstart event handlers, or how
# upstart works, see init(5), init(8), and initctl(8).
#
# Default runlevel. The runlevels used are:
#   0 – halt (Do NOT set initdefault to this)
#   1 – Single user mode
#   2 – Multiuser, without NFS (The same as 3, if you do not have networking)
#   3 – Full multiuser mode
#   4 – unused
#   5 – X11
#   6 – reboot (Do NOT set initdefault to this)
#
id:3:initdefault:
Change the startup level of the system from 3 to 5, and then restart the system. After the restart, the following interface appears. Follow the prompts. After the operation is completed, restart the system and it is OK.